Is this HG or Morning Sickness???

Distinguish between HG and Morning Sickness

Symptoms of Hyperemesis Gravidarum

 

-Severe nausea and or vomiting that you are unable to eat and drink or function. 
-Food aversions.
-Weight loss of 5% or more of pre-pregnancy weight.
-Decrease in urination.

- Brown or orange urine.

-Dehydration.
-Headaches.
-Confusion.

-Hallucinations due to severe dehydration.

-Fainting.
-Jaundice.
-Extreme fatigue.
-Low blood pressure.
-Rapid heart rate.

-Sweating and or chills.

-Body ache.

-Stomach pain severe. 

-Burning pain in throat from vomiting/ throat raw due to extreme vomiting.

-Battery acid heartburn. 
-Loss of skin elasticity.
-Anxiety/depression.

-Content nausea that affects everyday life.

-Unusual thoughts or behaviors. 

- Vomiting and unable to hold food or fluids down.

-Ketones in your urine.

-Everything you drink or eat comes back up.

-Unable to eat or drink due to severe nausea. 

-Anemia.

-Body odor (from rapid fat loss & ketosis)
-Decreased urination.

- Feeling pressure you have to pee and only pee a drop.
-Dehydration/Malnourishment. 
-Dry, furry tongue.

-Cracked corners of lips or chapped cracked lips, that can bleed.
-Excessive salivation you must spit out.
-Extreme fatigue more than normal.
-Fainting or dizziness combined
-Gall bladder dysfunction
-Hypersensitive gag reflex
-Increased sense of smell( Like a hound dog)
-Intolerance to motion/noise/light.
-Ketosis.
-Liver enzyme elevation.
-Loss of skin elasticity.
-Low blood pressure.
-Overactive thyroid or -parathyroid.
-Pale, waxy, dry skin.
-Rapid heart rate.
-Vitamin/electrolyte deficiency.
-Vomiting of mucus, bile or blood.

Symptoms of Morning Sickness

 

-Nausea sometimes accompanied by vomiting

- Nausea that allows you to be able to still function and doesn't last 24/7

-Only vomiting sometimes but able to hold food down and fluids once you get it all out

-Feeling better once you vomit vs HG no matter how much you vomit that feeling don't go away

-Able to put on weight

-Nausea that subsides at 12 weeks or soon after

-Vomiting that does not cause severe dehydration

- Able to function

_ Able to hold fluids and food down once your done vomiting

-Able to work

-Able to enjoy pregnancy

-After 12 weeks feel normal

-Able to gain and put on weight for the most part

What is HG?

Hyperemesis Gravidarum - HG for short. Is a severe life threatening pregnancy sickness, this is not morning sickness, it is beyond. With HG, it is extreme nausea and vomiting that is "unrelenting, excessive pregnancy-related nausea and/or vomiting that  prevents adequate intake of food and fluids." It causes severe dehydration and undernourishment in the mother. HG and morning sickness are not one in the same. Don't let anyone tell you that they are the same as they are NOT!

Below we will explain what the difference is and some FACTS about HG and morning sickness.

When Does HG Normally Start?

Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG) begins between usually (for most) the fourth and sixth week of pregnancy but can start earlier or later for others. Starr started having symptoms of HG right after she conceived her baby. Some HG mothers know they are pregnant before a positive test due too the strong HG symptoms. Symptoms usually improve somewhat by the 15th to 20th week of gestation. For some women though, HG doesn't go away. HG can also cause frequent relapses throughout pregnancy. For Starr, she was sick all nine months and it did not taper down. Most affected women have numerous episodes of vomiting throughout the day with few (if any) symptom-free periods, especially during the first three to four months. The symptoms can be mild for some mothers, while others are sick everyday up until birth of their child. This leads to significant and rapid weight loss, dehydration, electrolyte disturbances, and nutritional deficiencies; often requiring hospitalization. Morning sickness does not make you this sick, please don't let anyone, including a doctor, tell you that HG is just morning sickness. Get a new doctor if that is the case.

If HG is prolonged without early treatment, this can lead to severe dehydration and undernourishment in the mother and can lead to kidney or liver damage. Numerous complications, some of which can be life-threatening are possible without adequate medical intervention during HG. These women present to their medical providers with weight loss of five to 20+ pounds, however, since some are overweight to begin with, they may not appear malnourished. This is especially true as the pregnancy progresses. Early medical care may decrease the severity of a woman's symptoms and lead to quicker recovery. Good medical care is key to fighting HG. An HG plan in place is super important.

What Causes HG?

 The exact cause of Hyperemesis Gravidarum is not known. A theory is thought to be believed that HG is caused from the high levels of hormones rapidly rising. Including the serum levels of hormones such as HCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) and estrogen. 

Risk factors include:

·  First pregnancy 

· Multiple pregnancy 

· Family history of Hyperemesis Gravidarum (not always the case) 

· Trophoblastic disorder

· High levels of hormones 

· Mitochondrial dysfunction, which can play a role for many HG mothers but more research is needed. 

The diagnosis is usually made based on the signs and symptoms. It has been technically defined as more than three episodes of vomiting per day such that weight loss of 5% or three kilograms has occurred and ketones are present in the urine. HG affects women differently from mild to severe. There is a wide range to HG. Other potential causes of the symptoms should be excluded including urinary tract infection and high thyroid levels. 

There is no known cure for HG but there are ways to help from becoming too dehydrated and malnourished, it includes drinking fluids and a bland diet. This is not always possible. Recommendations may include electrolyte-replacement drinks, B vitamins (Thiamine), and a higher protein diet. Many HG mothers require intravenous fluids and medications to survive. Medications such as pyridoxine or metoclopramide, Prochlorperazine, dimenhydrinate, or ondansetron may be used. Hospitalization may be required for IV fluids and IV medication. Some mothers are so sick they need to be on home health care to have a round the clock treatment. While vomiting in pregnancy has been described as early as 2,000 BC, the first clear medically description of Hyperemesis Gravidarum was in 1852 by Antoine Dubois. Hyperemesis Gravidarum is estimated to affect 2% of pregnant women. Mothers and babies can die from an HG pregnancy. An HG mother is 4 times more likely to have preterm labor, a miscarriage and a higher risk of premature birth than a mother with just morning sickness. Some women have abortions because the symptoms are so unbearable, the lack of understanding from doctors and/or family members and doctors refusing to treat HG nor take it seriously, they feel it is the only way out to survive.

 

UCLA University of Southern California 23andMe mean? Here's some insight from lead researcher and Harvard-trained geneticist, Dr. Marlena Fejzo.

"Moms with hyperemesis  gravidarum, or HG, get nausea and vomiting, and lose their appetites and drop weight. It can get so bad, they need IV’s, medication, and feeding tubes.  Fejzo studied thousands of pregnant moms’ DNA and noticed that proteins from two genes are abnormally high in women with HG.

Fejzo said, “The protein then goes to the brain and signals this loss of appetite and nausea and vomiting in extreme cases. So there’s quite a bit of evidence now that it is a cause.” 

Her discovery doesn’t mean relief is coming soon, but it’s a start."


Diagnosing Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy that can be life threatening if not treated. It is generally described as unrelenting, excessive pregnancy-related nausea and/or vomiting that prevents adequate intake of food and fluids. If severe and/or inadequately treated, it is typically associated with:


Loss of greater than 5% of pre-pregnancy body weight (usually over 10%)
Dehydration and production of ketones
Nutritional deficiencies
Metabolic imbalances
Difficulty with daily activities

Laboratory findings at the time of presentation include:

Signs of dehydration and starvation such as:

· Increased ketones.

· Increased urine specific gravity.

· Increased blood urea nitrogen.

· Electrolyte imbalances such as abnormal levels of sodium and potassium. 

· Increase in liver enzymes, such as in aspartame aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase or bilirubin activity. 

· Abnormal thyroid and parathyroid levels. 

· Increased hematocrit, indicating a contracted blood volume. 

· Electrolyte changes include decreased sodium, potassium, chloride and magnesium levels. However, in some women, lab levels such as electrolytes may appear falsely concentrated due to dehydration. Treatment for these women is advisable to replace marginally normal levels of electrolytes and nutrients. In general, whenever IV fluids are given for dehydration in hyper-emetic women, parenteral vitamins and electrolytes should also be administered. 

If the woman has been unable to eat sufficiently for a few weeks and has also been vomiting, she is at high-risk for nutritional deficiencies. Being pregnant, she is also in a state of accelerated starvation, meaning the adverse effects of starvation will occur more quickly. Significant malnutrition can occur in these women over time. Many nutrients are depleted in a relatively short time frame, especially water-soluble vitamins, such as thiamine. Thiamine deficiency has been well-documented in hyper-emetic women and may lead to Wernicke's encephalopathy (an inflammatory, hemorrhagic form of encephalopathy). The prognosis is then poor as irreversible neurological damage and even death may occur. Fortunately, most women with less severe HG or those who are treated aggressively early in pregnancy, will not have life-threatening complications or a prolonged recovery. Identifying women at risk for developing HG is helpful so baseline laboratory tests can be done prior to onset of severe symptoms.

Know the Facts about HG

 FACT #1
-HG can kill mother and child.

FACT #2
-HG cannot be cured. Only managed and possibly controlled.

FACT #3
-HG causes severe dehydration and malnutrition if not managed.

FACT #4

-1 out of 3 babies don't survive HG.  

FACT #5
-HG can cause life long medical conditions for mother and child. Well after HG is over.

FACT #6 

-HG can cause premature birth.

FACT #7

-HG aftermath is very real for the mother. 

Learn if you have HG.

What is HG?

Hyperemesis Gravidarum- HG for short. Is a severe life threatening pregnancy sickness, this is NOT morning sickness. HG, "unrelenting, excessive pregnancy-related nausea and/or vomiting that prevents adequate intake of food and fluids." It causes severe dehydration and malnourishment in the mother. HG and morning sickness are not one in the same. Don't let anyone tell you that they are the same as they are NOT! Below we will explain what the difference is and some facts about HG and morning sickness.

What is Morning Sickness?

Morning sickness, is a symptom of pregnancy that involves nausea or vomiting. Despite the name, nausea or vomiting can occur at any time during the day. Typically these symptoms occur between the 4th and 16th week of pregnancy. About 10% of women still have symptoms after the 20th week of pregnancy.

Medication to treat HG

The type of treatment that is required depends on how ill a woman becomes. Possible treatments might include: 

  • Preventive measures
  • Intravenous fluids
  • Total parenteral nutrition
  • Medicines

HG Support Group

There are many HG groups that offer help with HG. We have groups online to help with ongoing support. 

Our Cafepress Store Shop Now!

Show off your baby bump with our HGBDATA merchandise. 

FAQs

Will HG go away? If so, when?

Will the medications I take hurt the baby?

Can I survive HG without medication?


I can't hold my pills down. What can I do?

TPN- Total Parenteral Nutrition

After several weeks of vomiting, you can become very malnourished, yet this may not be realized by health professionals who only see you periodically. This is especially true if you are above your ideal body weight prior to pregnancy. TPPN (Total Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition) or TPN (Total Parenteral Nutrition) may be ordered by your physician to ensure you receive adequate nutrition. TPPN supplies many more nutrients than basic IV fluids, and may be given in a regular (peripheral) IV in the arm. However, the IV will typically only last for a few days and will then need to be replaced. If your health care doctor won't give you TPN you may need to fight for it. Many doctors are misinformed on HG it is very important to do your research.

What is TPN?

TPN supplies most of your daily nutritional requirements and is usually given through a catheter called a PICC line placed in the arm, or a central venous line placed in the neck/shoulder area. Local anesthetic is given to minimize pain during the procedure. These catheters are much longer and the end point is in the heart. This allows very concentrated nutrients to be given without damage to the smaller blood vessels of the arms. It is important to note that TPPN/TPN is not a complete formula. Added multivitamins are very important to avoid nutritionally-related complications.  Management of HG with Parenteral Nutrition  Once you lose over 5% of your pre-pregnancy body weight, nutritional therapies should be discussed, especially if you continue to have significant nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. At a minimum, IV home therapy with added vitamins should be administered after a few weeks of frequent vomiting. Once you lose 8-10% of your body weight or have been vomiting for more than a month, it is imperative that you receive support to replace the many nutrients you have lost and to maintain your hydration. TPPN or TPN is the next choice for ongoing replacement. Dehydration perpetuates the vomiting cycle, as do nutritional deficiencies. If nutritional support is not offered and/or you are not responding to anti-vomiting medications, a second opinion with a specialist may be needed. Nutrition is one of the most challenging and important issues for women with HG. Pregnant women require a variety of nutrients both for their own healing and for the normal development of their unborn child. The baby's requirements for minerals, vitamins, and other nutrients come first and are taken from the mother's bones, organs, tissues, and other storage areas. This can leave the mother depleted very quickly, which can take months, or even years, to correct.  These nutrients are also needed to form the placenta, to increase the size of the uterus and breast tissue, and to create amniotic fluid. A mother's blood volume increases by 25–50%, and more fluids, iron, B12, folic acid, zinc and copper, calcium, magnesium, and proteins are needed to support this new blood. Storage levels of most nutrients must be obtained from the diet as well. A nutritional consult may be helpful both during and after pregnancy to ensure she sufficiently rebuilds her nutrient stores, especially before becoming pregnant again.

Food Aversions and Cravings

Nutrition is one of the most challenging and important issues for women with HG. Pregnant women require a variety of nutrients both for their own healing and for the normal development of their unborn child. The baby's requirements for minerals, vitamins, and other nutrients come first and are taken from the mother's bones, organs, tissues, and other storage areas. This can leave the mother depleted very quickly, which can take months, or even years, to correct.  These nutrients are also needed to form the placenta, to increase the size of the uterus and breast tissue, and to create amniotic fluid. A mother's blood volume increases by 25–50%, and more fluids, iron, B12, folic acid, zinc and copper, calcium, magnesium, and proteins are needed to support this new blood. Storage levels of most nutrients must be obtained from the diet as well. A nutritional consult may be helpful both during and after pregnancy to ensure she sufficiently rebuilds her nutrient stores, especially before becoming pregnant again. TPN supplies most of you daily nutritional requirements and is usually given through a catheter called a PICC line placed in the arm, or a central venous line placed in the neck/shoulder area. Local anesthetic is given to minimize pain during the procedure. These catheters are much longer and the end point is in the heart. This allows very concentrated nutrients to be given without damage to the smaller blood vessels of the arms. It is important to note that TPPN/TPN is not a complete formula. Added multivitamins are very important to avoid nutritionally-related complications. 

It is very typical for mothers with HG to have very strong cravings and aversions that prohibit a well-balanced diet for much of their pregnancies, and these preferences may change frequently until delivery. It may be the smell, texture, appearance or taste that leads to nausea and vomiting.  The cause is likely a complex interaction of endocrine (hormone) changes related to pregnancy, nutrient deficiencies, mechanical changes in the body, gastrointestinal dysfunction (e.g. reflux), and changes in neurochemicals. The intensity of cravings and aversions can be very high and trigger repeated bouts of severe nausea and/or vomiting.  Thinking about foods, smelling them, or even just seeing food on the television is enough to trigger vomiting for many. She may crave very specific combinations of food characteristics, such as salty and crunchy, or sweet and soft. Entering a grocery store, opening the refrigerator, or even contemplating food preparation are usually intolerable for at least the first trimester. This has significant impact both on her and her family, and is not something she can control.  These issues have to be acknowledged, supported and accepted by her family and care providers. It's impossible to fully understand the unusual dietary preferences of HG unless you have experienced it for yourself. Trying to force other foods that do not appeal will typically result in vomiting and greater anxiety for the mother. If a HG mother as for any type of food or drink let her have it. Do not try to force a mother to eat something she doesn't want, you will only make it worse.

Medications v. Parenteral Nutrition

While nutritional support is important, some physicians initiate home TPN without having first attempted an adequate trial of antiemetic medications. Serious complications are possible when central venous lines are placed, as well as metabolic and infectious complications. These are usually due to insertion technique, improper care of the IV site or line, or inadequate monitoring of your metabolic and nutritional status with blood tests. However, these problems are estimated to occur in only a small percentage of women with HG, even when TPN is given at home.  Before TPN is begun, consideration should be given to aggressive anti-vomiting medications and home IV therapy with vitamins, which do not put you at risk for any life-threatening complications. A growing number of women report that drugs from the serotonin antagonist category (e.g. Zofran, Anzemet, Kytril) have been used in higher doses in their subsequent pregnancies, eliminating the need for TPN and even IV's in some cases. Many physicians (and midwives) are not familiar with the use of these drugs during pregnancy, and are reluctant to offer them in adequate doses (and early enough) to give mothers relief from incessant vomiting. Feel free to refer your health professionals to our site for assistance or find a physician up-to-date on caring for mothers with hyperemesis.After several weeks of vomiting, you can become very malnourished, yet this may not be realized by health professionals who only see you periodically. This is especially true if you are above your ideal body weight prior to pregnancy. TPPN (Total Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition) or TPN (Total Parenteral Nutrition) may be ordered by your physician to ensure you receive adequate nutrition. TPPN supplies many more nutrients than basic IV fluids, and may be given in a regular (peripheral) IV in the arm. However, the IV will typically only last for a few days and will then need to be replaced.   TPN supplies most of you daily nutritional requirements and is usually given through a catheter called a PICC line placed in the arm, or a central venous line placed in the neck/shoulder area. Local anesthetic is given to minimize pain during the procedure. These catheters are much longer and the end point is in the heart. This allows very concentrated nutrients to be given without damage to the smaller blood vessels of the arms. It is important to note that TPPN/TPN is not a complete formula. Added multivitamins are very important to avoid nutritionally-related complications.

Management of HG with Parenteral Nutrition

Once you lose over 5% of your pre-pregnancy body weight, nutritional therapies should be discussed, especially if you continue to have significant nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. At a minimum, IV home therapy with added vitamins should be administered after a few weeks of frequent vomiting. Once you lose 8-10% of your body weight or have been vomiting for more than a month, it is imperative that you receive support to replace the many nutrients you have lost and to maintain your hydration. TPPN or TPN is the next choice for ongoing replacement. Dehydration perpetuates the vomiting cycle, as do nutritional deficiencies. If nutritional support is not offered and/or you are not responding to anti-vomiting medications, a second opinion with a specialist may be needed.  See our Referral Network for tips on finding a doctor experienced in treating HG. You may need a friend or spouse to advocate for you while you are sick.

Nutritional Deficiencies and Hyperemesis

Nutritional Deficiencies during Pregnancy.

Women with HG may vomit or have severe nausea for months that will leave her exhausted and very depleted. It is imperative that women losing weight rapidly and that are not responding to medications; be given nutritional support via fluids. Research has shown significant nutrient depletion in these women. Vitamins, especially B-vitamins, are depleted very quickly and if not replaced; can worsen her symptoms or put her at risk for life-threatening neurological disorders like Wernicke's Encephalopathy and central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). 


At a minimum, mothers requiring hydration should also receive vitamins and electrolytes. Those who continue to lose over 5% of their body weight in  the early months should be considered for IV nutrition to protect the mother and unborn child's well-being. Studies show that an inadequate nourished fetus may grow and develop more slowly, have chronic disease in later life, and is more likely to be preterm.

HG mother's are also at greater risk  for complications such as pre-eclampsia and postpartum depression.  Ironically, nutrition is likely the most prolific topic related to pregnancy, yet when a woman has HG, she is often told malnutrition will not harm her unborn child or herself. Surgical patients are given nutritional therapy typically within one week if they are still unable to eat. If, some doctors seem fit to provide you. It is equally as important to find a knowledgeable HG doctor. Mother's with HG often go weeks or  months without food or hydration and are slowly starving and not receiving nutritional support. Research does not support the idea that prolonged starvation is acceptable during pregnancy. These women should be given interventions and better care to promote a healthier outcome for both the mother and child.

Lasting effects can make the aftermath of HG even harder for recovery. 

Enteral (NG/PEG) Nutrition:

In recent years, research has increased on the use of feedings by either a nasogastric (NG), or a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube as an alternative to parenteral (intravenous) nutrition. This is mostly attributed to decreasing the cost of medical care, and increasing  safety. A NG tube is passed through the nose to the stomach or jejunum,  and the PEG requires a surgical procedure to implant it through the abdomen into the stomach. Sometimes, the tube will be advanced into the jejunum for added safety and tolerance. This is another form of being  able to get nutrition. 

PICC (Peripherally inserted central catheter) Line:

What is a PICC line? 


A PICC line is a long, soft, flexible tube that is inserted through a vein in the upper arm. PICC stands for Percutaneously Inserted Central Catheter.


When is a PICC line used for HG?  


A PICC line is used when a HG mom cannot hold down any fluids food and medications. HG moms needs intravenous medication,  such as fluids or hydration during HG or other medical issues .  It is important that you know how to take care of your picc line to prevent itching, redness and blisters. Infection rate and blood clots are a huge risk. if you do not care for it right or a nurse that has zero clue what they are doing.  You must weigh the benefits over the risk.  There are many types of PICC lines out there, they are not all equal.

 PICC lines if cared for correctly, can stay in the whole pregnancy.  A PICC line can stay in for an extended period of time , unlike a IV in your hand.  HG  moms need hydration and medication and  nutrition,  TPN if needed .  Medications quickly cause smaller veins to clot off and blow , so they must be delivered into the larger veins closer to the heart.

PICC line are used for other health issues, when someone requires frequent blood sampling.  The most common uses for a PICC line are for giving antibiotics and chemotherapy through the veins , however moms with HG, it is a good treatment choice for HG moms to get hydration and TPN . The aftermath of poor care during an HG pregnancy can continue and affect you and your baby. after your baby is born.


How is the PICC line placed? 


A healthcare professional will place a PICC line in your arm.  They will numb your arm. If you feel any pain speak up. If you have POTS Syndrome or Mast cell activation syndrome ask them to tilt the head of the bed. 

The procedure is done either in a hospital or in an outpatient facility. Using a needle called a guide wire, the professional inserts the PICC line into a vein located in the arm. From there it is threaded into a larger vein near the heart.

Once the catheter is in the correct position, the needle or guide wire is removed and the catheter is left in place. The catheter site is covered with a sterile dressing and the tubing is securely taped to the person's skin.

Plastic tubing is connected to the end of the catheter.  A Chest x-ray will be done after the PICC line is inserted to check that it is correctly placed.  If you are having chest pain after placement or feeling your heart race please let the nurse know.  Sometimes the line needs to be pull back 1-3 cm. 

PICC line catheters can generally remain in place for days to several months. In some cases, the catheter can remain in place for up to a year.


What type of care does the PICC line require? 


The dressing is changed once a week by a healthcare a nurse . If the catheter is not being used continuously, it can be flushed with saline solution to prevent it from clogging. We recommend that you flush it 3-4 times a day. If you have a double lumen flush both sides.  Take care of your PICC line, keep it clean and keep a clean cover on it. If it becomes dirty or wet it needs to be changed right away. 


What precautions should be taken after a PICC line has been inserted? 


The catheter site must be kept dry. The person may bathe or shower as long as the insertion site is protected with a water-resistant covering.  Shower covers are not all the same . The limbO cover is the best by far to put on and protect your line from getting wet. If your dressing gets wet you must get it change right away.  Please call your home health company and let them know right away.

Do not let anyone check your blood pressure on your PICC line arm.

The PICC line site should be checked every day for signs of infection such as redness, swelling, or pain.


What are the complications associated with a PICC line?


 A PICC line is designed to stay in place for many months. However, the catheter can sometimes cause phlebitis, or vein irritation, causing a red streak to appear on the arm.

If the line becomes infected, you may develop a fever, chills, or a rash. Contact your healthcare professional right away. Your doctor should be notified of these, or any other new or worsening symptoms. Your PICC line, left untreated can cause Sepsis that can be life threatening.  .  Your PICC line will dangle out of your arm. The tubing coming out needs to be treated as if it was your baby. Do not lift anything more than 1-3 pounds it can dislodged your line. If you have small children do not lift them with that arm, get help if you can.  

You PICC line cannot get wet and you need to make sure it's not pulled out and being on the outside of your arm there is that risk ! Your dressing must be changed weekly by a nurse that knows what they are doing! The dressing is changed once a week by a registered nurse. If the catheter is not being used continuously, the nurse will flush the line with saline solution to prevent it from clogging.

PICC lines are easy to care for , please research it so you know the steps of how your arm should be kept clean.   If you like to learn more to care for your PICC line check out Mighty Well  . This is a  great article  7 things not to do with a PICC line. 


If you are interested in buying one of their PICCPerfect covers use coupon code: HGBDATA  at checkout. 

Many moms want to hide there PICC line. They are embarrassed. There are two PICC line covers Starr uses. 


What precautions should be taken after a PICC line has been inserted with Hyperemesis Gravidarum?


You must keep the catheter site dry. The person may bathe or shower as long as the insertion site is protected with a water-resistant covering . It must be a Waterproof PICC line Protector is a must. One of our favorites shower covers is called  LimbO

 The PICC line site should be checked every day for signs of infection, such as redness, swelling, or pain.


What are the complications associated with a PICC line?


A PICC line is designed to stay in place for many months. However, the catheter can sometimes cause phlebitis, or vein irritation. If this occurs, a red streak may appear on the arm, and the healthcare provider needs be notified.  Home health care usually have an answering service.

Infection is also possible, but not rare during HG.

The nurse or doctor should also be notified if you develops a fever, chills. If you have extreme itching, blisters please contact your nurse and send us a message for tips and we be glad to help. 


Some HG moms get a central line, if a PICC line is not working well. A port or hickman line is a special intravenous line, called a central line. This type of IV is inserted through the chest and threaded into one of the large veins that lie close to the heart. A central line or PICC line can have multiple ports that can be used for drawing blood samples, administering long-term IV therapy like fluids and TPN and medication. 


How is the procedure performed?


A central line is inserted under sterile conditions. This m  is usually placed in the Trendelenburg position, which means the head is below the level of the heart. The skin is cleansed, and a local anesthetic is injected to make the area numb. A healthcare professional advances the line until it reaches the large vein of the chest. The catheter is then sutured in place, and a sterile dressing is applied.


What happens right after the procedure?


A chest X-ray will be done right away after a central line is inserted to confirm that it is in the right position. The line should not be used until the X-ray is done.  A central line can usually stay in place for the whole pregnancy, if cared for properly.  Some women need aftermath care and keep them in longer. 


What happens later at home?


If you’re going home with the central line, your family will need to learn how to care for the catheter. A visiting nurse can come to the home to help the family with the care at first. The bandage at the insertion site will need to be changed every 3-7 days. The insertion site should also be inspected closely for signs of infection. These signs include redness, warmth, drainage, and swelling.


What are the potential complications after the procedure?


While inserting the line, it is possible to puncture the lung. The catheter may irritate the heart and cause irregular heartbeats, called arrhythmias. Other complications may include:

Air embolism

Bleeding

Blood clot in the tubing

Infection

Migration (your line can be replace if this happens) however having a  SecurAcath® can help preserve the line.  We highly recommend a SecurAcath to keep your Iv in place.

SecurAcath® is the only Subcutaneous Engineered Stabilization Device (ESD) that meets the 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice.

The new Standards state Subcutaneous ESDs have been successful in stabilizing PICCs and CVADs

- Patient outcomes and patient and inserter satisfaction have been favorable

The Standards also include a new caution to be aware of the risk of adhesive-related skin injury (MARSI) associated with the use of adhesive-based ESDs 

- SecurAcath eliminates MARSI complications of adhesive-based ESDs

Any of these complications may lead to the removal of the central line.  Contact us if you have any questions, or if you need help to get in touch with the company of SecurAcath® 


How to choose a PICC line cover for your PICC line arm.?


When choosing a PICC line cover it is important to know ahead of time of what type of cover you like.  This does not replace the sterile dressing, these  go over your dressing to keep it clean and protect your PICC line and tubing. 

These go over your dressing to keep it safe. One of our favorite covers and companies who we love at HGBDATA is a cover made by: CareAline is cotton, it soft and great for people who has sensitive skin. 


CareAline 


CareAline PICC Sleeve  is the original Award Winning and Hospital Approved CareAline PICC Sleeve keeps your infusion lines in place, keeping them off of your skin. Their products keep lines off of your skin because lines are fed through a specially designed, patented buttonhole. This eliminates the need for irritating tape to hold the tube and cap in place when you are not being treated. There is a pocket that keeps your caps safe and secure while not in use, and a patented privacy cover to keep everything hidden. If you are interested in buying a PICC line cover instead of using mesh or a old sock. We have two companies that have outstanding products to cover your PICC line and highly recommend with the Starr's seal of approval .  

CareAline and PICCPerfect both are great covers depending on what type of fabric you prefer. Use coupon code : HGBDATA at checkout for a discount for all of  our HG moms who need  to feel better to lift their self esteem.  


PICCPerfect

 

The PICCPerfect® 2.0 PICC Line Cover protects and covers your PICC Line and helps prevent pulling and/or displacement. Its unique fold-over design and double access openings will allow you to do your medical treatment without exposing your PICC Line insertion site. Your PICC does not have to touch your skin!

  Use coupon code: HGBDATA at checkout for both websites . 




Home Health Care:

Having IV fluids at home or TPN and medications such as a Zofran pump can be life saving to stay out of the hospital . A nurse can come to your home  to put your IV in every few days if your doctor will not do a PICC Line, It's important to know your options.